Software Defined Networking - "The Biggest Thing Since Ethernet"

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SDN Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Patrick Hubbard, Elizabeth White, Amitabh Sinha, Mike Wood

Related Topics: Virtualization Magazine, SDN Journal

Blog Post

SDN and NFV: How They Differ, How They Relate By @MJannery | @CloudExpo #SDN

SDN and NFV can be used separately, but can also complement each other if used together

If you’re curious about learning the difference between Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV) and how they relate, here’s a good article for you. I've written a quick summary.

How they're different:

SDN is about separating the control and data planes, centralizing control, and programming network behavior. Control is the operative word, especially as data centers continue to expand and the use of virtual machines proliferates.

NFV was developed by a group of service providers who wanted to deploy new network services faster, but were hindered by the variety and complexity of hardware appliances. NFV virtualizes and consolidates this equipment onto industry standard servers.

How they relate:

SDN and NFV can be used separately, but can also complement each other if used together. NFV can support SDN by providing the infrastructure on which SDN software can run. The article shows an example of this where NFV virtualizes the function of a router, while SDN separates the control and data planes. The result is faster performance through an optimized data plane, greater agility and efficiency due to virtualization and central control, and lower capital equipment costs from switching to "generic" devices.

More Stories By Michael Jannery

Michael Jannery is CEO of Entuity. He is responsible for setting the overall corporate strategy, vision, and direction for the company. He brings more than 30 years of experience to Entuity with 25 years in executive management.

Prior to Entuity, he was Vice President of Marketing for Proficiency, where he established the company as the thought, technology, and market leader in a new product lifecycle management (PLM) sub-market. Earlier, Michael held VP of Marketing positions at Gradient Technologies, where he established them as a market leader in the Internet security sector, and Cayenne Software, a leader in the software and database modeling market. He began his career in engineering.